Home

What's New

Come along with Collie, the Land Preservation Specialist at the Conservancy, as he visits Roots & Shoots Nursery and discusses some of the best native plants to feature in your yard!

From longleaf pine trees to beautyberry shrubs, learn more about some of the best plants you can add to your yard to help native wildlife.

As we continue to work towards our vision of a Kiawah Island where the unique natural environment is preserved for generations to come, we're shifting our mission to better meet the needs of conservation on Kiawah Island. With our new mission, we measure, manage, improve, and advocate for the ecological health of Kiawah Island and its environs.

Wednesday, May 26, 5-7pm

We're opening the season with a garden soiree to celebrate the natural beauty of Kiawah Island with live music and delicious food and drink, all in our beautiful Naturally Kiawah Demonstration Garden in Night Heron Park!

Want to help make a difference while you shop in the Amazon app, at no extra cost to you? Simply follow the instructions below to select "The Kiawah Island Natural Habitat Conservancy Inc" as your charity and activate AmazonSmile in the app. They'll donate a portion of your eligible mobile app purchases to us.

April 19-24

Celebrate Earth Day with a week of nature and conservation-focused events, including webinars, nature walks, virtual storytimes, livestreams and more! Check out our full Earth Week schedule to learn how you can join in and help us celebrate our planet.

A bobcat den on one of our properties containing two kittens was recently disturbed by vegetative removal happening without the Conservancy’s permission, causing the bobcat to abandon her den.
Read our letter to learn how the Conservancy is responding.

Pine Trees

Plants in nature and in the residential landscape provide many benefits for humans and wildlife. Of all the types of plants available, native plants found naturally in the region are more suited for local conditions, tolerating several environmental extremes found on barrier islands. They also provide the most ecological benefits to wildlife.

Pine trees play a surprisingly big role in Kiawah's ecosystem. They are adept at living in a range of environments and can live hundreds of years. Learn more about the species of pine trees found on Kiawah Island and the important role they play in our environment in this episode of Learning with Lee.

WATCH NOW

Anhingas

We’re going bird watching! If you’ve spent much time around Kiawah’s ponds and lagoons, you’ve probably seen anhingas diving for fish or sunning their wings on nearby branches. Now, spot them in this week’s episode of Learning with Lee!

Whether you know them as "snakebirds," "water turkeys," or "darters," learn all about these high-flying water birds.

 

2030 Strategic Plan

The Conservancy was founded 1997 to maintaining the natural beauty and habitat of Kiawah Island. Since that time the Conservancy has focused on preserving properties, educating the public on the importance of preservation, fundraising, protecting natural habitats, and sharing with the world what a remarkable place Kiawah Island is.

Now, with more than 23 years of knowledge and experience under our belts, it’s the ideal time to chart a path forward and build on our momentum. Through our new 2030 Strategic Plan we are laying a foundation that will guide our growth as we strive to dramatically extend our reach and broaden our impact.

Join us in ensuring the natural beauty and ecological health of Kiawah Island is preserved for generations to come.

Learn More

Sharks and Rays: Not a mean bone in their body

Dive into our newest Conservation Matters program, Sharks and Rays: Not a mean bone in their body, presented by Dr. David Plourd. You'll not only learn about whale sharks and manta rays, but you might just swim away with a new perspective and appreciation for these seemingly frightening creatures!

PREMIERING TODAY AT 3 PM

Kiawah's Wildlife Species Need Your Help Now!

Bobcats are one of the most unique species on Kiawah Island and catching a glimpse of one is on the bucket list of almost every Kiawah resident and visitor alike. Unfortunately, in recent years, the use of anticoagulant rodenticides has caused an increase in bobcat deaths. In recent testing additional willdife species (five raccoons and one opossum) also tested positive for anticoagulant rodenticides in their system. This new eidence confirms the dangers and impacts to Kiawah's wildlife.

How can you help save Kiawah's bobcats? All Kiawah property owners are encouraged to take the pledge to stop using antigoagulant rodenticides on their property and become a Bobcat Guardian today. Visit www.savekiawahbobcats.com to learn more and take the pledge today.

See the lists of pest control providers that have and have NOT signed the Bobcat Guardian Provider Pledge on our Wildlife Perservation Efforts page.

Wax Myrtle

Plants in nature and in the residential landscape provide many benefits for humans and wildlife. Of all the types of plants available, native plants found naturally in the region are more suited for local conditions, tolerating several environmental extremes found on barrier islands. They also provide the most ecological benefits to wildlife.

One of the most common, yet exceptional native plants found on Kiawah Island is the southern wax myrtle. Learn more about the wax myrtle and its importance in this issue of Learning with Lee.

WATCH NOW

September 15, 2020

The Kiawah Conservancy (Conservancy) has been working in concert with the Town of Kiawah Island (TOKI) concerning the use of anticoagulant rodenticides and their deleterious effects on our bobcat population here on Kiawah Island. Not only do these anticoagulants poison our bobcats, but they also poison additional rodent predators such as eagles, owls, hawks, snakes, raccoons, alligators, and other animals. Use of Anticoagulant Rodenticides on Kiawah Island. Click the link below to read the Kiawah Conservancy's Position Statement on the Use of Anticoagulant Rodenticides on Kiawah Island.

Yaupon Holly

Check out our latest episode of Learning with Lee and learn all about Yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria). Did you know yaupon hollies can be found growing naturally in the maritime forest and salt shrub thicket? Tune in at 3pm today and learn all about this Kiawah native.

Willdlife-Friendly Landscapes

Check out our latest episode of Learning with Lee and learn about Kiawah Island's native plants and how they encourage wildlife within our island landscapes.

 
Terrestrial Invertebrates and Plants on the Dune System of Kiawah Island

WATCH NOW

Watch and learn as Dr Eric McElroy from the College of Charleston shares his fascinating research results from his 2019 study of Terrestrial Invertebrates and Plants on the Dune System of Kiawah Island. Plants provide stability, protection, and biodiversity on the dunes and are important for the ecological health of Kiawah Island. It is interesting that although the dunes may appear similar when viewing from the beach, there are significant differences in the specific survey areas.

Naturally Kiawah Pathways Tours

Discover stories unique to Kiawah as you enjoy our Naturally Kiawah Pathways tours through the free TravelStorys app. Take a virtual tour of Kiawah Island through our Naturally Kiawah Pathways on the TravelStorys app. Explore and learn about the habitats, wildlife, and history of Kiawah Island from the comfort of your home!

LEARN MORE

Kiawah's Butterflies

Check out our latest episode of Learning with Lee and learn all about some of Kiawah's most colorful creatures... Butterflies!

Meet Lowcountry Marine Mammal Network (LMMN) Executive Director Lauren Rust and learn how the LMMN is working to protect marine mammals around the Lowcountry through science, education, and conservation. The LMMN provides a variety of educational programs throughout the Charleston area including the Kiawah Island Dolphin Education Program.